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How Airbnb drives users’ actions with their landing page design — a UX analysis


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There is a reason you are not familiar with many -maybe not even one- of Airbnb’s competitors. The renting/booking marketplace “giant” has…

Pretty interesting in how minimalist design reduce cognitive load and drive attention towards CTA.

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