Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

[Article] User Story Mapping - a great tool for business analysis


Jimi Wikman
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • Owner

User Story Mapping is something that you probably have heard about if you work as product owner, business analyst or requirement analyst. It is a great tool for quickly break down customer journeys into system areas to map out work. The trick however is to use it where it is useful, which is in the business process when working with business analysis.

I often see people presenting User Story Mapping as a requirement tool, or even something that is useful for development as a backlog tool. This is usually suggested by business analysts and managers such as product owners, which makes sense because it is for them User Story Mapping is actually useful. Unfortunately it makes no sense for a developer since code are not following a customer journey.

Easy Agile User Story Maps for Jira

For development, it is often very difficult to map things into a User Story Map. This is especially difficult for backend development where a lot of the work never even is seen by the end user. This causes some issues, not because User Story Mapping is bad in any way, but because it is defined on a user story level, when it is actually a process above the user story level.

For me this process is best used on the business side to map out features by the product owner and the Business Analyst. This is where the User Story Map truly shines, making it easy to understand where in the customer journey certain features live in a visual way. That is not to say that it has no value to a developer, quite the opposite. It is very useful to understand what feature you are working on and where it fit in the flow of things.

It is just not what is important for the development itself.

When it comes to the development itself you still want to have well-defined user stories in the form of work orders and acceptance criteria. Each user story also need to be small enough to be possible to complete within one increment (one sprint) and in most cases you will find that the user stories presented in the User Story Map are way too big for that.

I would actually suggest to not use the term user story mapping since that to me is misleading. I would instead call it User Feature Mapping to avoid confusion.

 

Try it!

You can use this purely analog by mapping up a customer journey on a white board and then use that with stickies, or you can take advantage of apps in Jira for example. My two favorites are Easy Agile User Story Maps for Jira by Easy Agile and Agile User Story Mapping Board for Jira by DevSamurai. Both are great tools that will give you the tools you need to get started with User Story Mapping.

 

 


View full blog article

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 0
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Days

Top Posters In This Topic

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By jan.ogren
      I have a long experience in business analysis, agile methods and project management and a genuine interest for the digital customer journey. The last 11 years I have focused on e-commerce within retail.

      I am used to working in complex projects and collaborating and communicating with several stakeholders. I am good at acquiring new knowledge, understanding the business and it´s needs and analysing and prioritizing those needs. I am used to improving processes and coaching scrum teams and organisations in an agile way of working. I am solution-oriented, goal-oriented and flexible. My goal is to continue to develop within BA and agile, so that I in future assignments can contribute in the best way to making sure that what is delivered is prioritized, in line with the business goals and fulfilling the customers' expectations.

      Areas of expertise
      • Business Analysis
      • Agile software development
      • Project Management
      • E-commerce strategy

      What drives me is that each assignment gives me the opportunity to bring about change and optimize. I get to know people and share knowledge and experience. In addition I learn more about the customer's business and digital landscape.

      My latest consultant assignments
      • H&M (Business Analyst)
      • J.Lindeberg (Feasibility study - GDPR)
      • Axfood (Application Expert SAP Hybris Commerce)
      • Axfood (Business Analyst and Scrum Master)
      • Bonniers (Product Owner)
      • Reima (Product Owner)
      • Stadium (Agile Project Manager and Business Analyst)
    • By Jimi Wikman
      User Story Mapping is something that you probably have heard about if you work as product owner, business analyst or requirement analyst. It is a great tool for quickly break down customer journeys into system areas to map out work. The trick however is to use it where it is useful, which is in the business process when working with business analysis.
      I often see people presenting User Story Mapping as a requirement tool, or even something that is useful for development as a backlog tool. This is usually suggested by business analysts and managers such as product owners, which makes sense because it is for them User Story Mapping is actually useful. Unfortunately it makes no sense for a developer since code are not following a customer journey.

      For development, it is often very difficult to map things into a User Story Map. This is especially difficult for backend development where a lot of the work never even is seen by the end user. This causes some issues, not because User Story Mapping is bad in any way, but because it is defined on a user story level, when it is actually a process above the user story level.
      For me this process is best used on the business side to map out features by the product owner and the Business Analyst. This is where the User Story Map truly shines, making it easy to understand where in the customer journey certain features live in a visual way. That is not to say that it has no value to a developer, quite the opposite. It is very useful to understand what feature you are working on and where it fit in the flow of things.
      It is just not what is important for the development itself.
      When it comes to the development itself you still want to have well-defined user stories in the form of work orders and acceptance criteria. Each user story also need to be small enough to be possible to complete within one increment (one sprint) and in most cases you will find that the user stories presented in the User Story Map are way too big for that.
      I would actually suggest to not use the term user story mapping since that to me is misleading. I would instead call it User Feature Mapping to avoid confusion.
       
      Try it!
      You can use this purely analog by mapping up a customer journey on a white board and then use that with stickies, or you can take advantage of apps in Jira for example. My two favorites are Easy Agile User Story Maps for Jira by Easy Agile and Agile User Story Mapping Board for Jira by DevSamurai. Both are great tools that will give you the tools you need to get started with User Story Mapping.
       
       
    • By Oscar Svensson
      As an integrated part of Zington's mission to enable Digital Transformation Core Parter focuses on:
      • Development and Architecture, mainly on the Java and Microsoft platforms
      Speciality: Deliver cutting edge agile solutions with incredible speed
      • Business Intelligence, AI and Performance Management
      Speciality: Artifical Intelligence, Predictive Analytics & Machine Learning

      In cooperation with Zington, we deliver robust and cost effective solutions based on the Microsoft/Java technology platform. And we do it fast! Our team within Information Managment are active in a number of areas such as ecommerce, retail, banking, finance and insurance. In addition to the common BI solutions, we have a strong focus on improve the quality of decision-making for our customers with predictive analytics and machine learning. We are also the competence center for everything related to operative agile management, with assignments ranging from lead developer and scrum master to head of software development. We strive to be the best in these areas, making our customers successful and strengthen Zington's overall offer.

      #C# #BI #AI #Microsoft #Java #MachineLearning #PredictiveAnaytics #Zington #Stockholm

×
×
  • Create New...