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[Article] Angular 9 is here - Project Ivy has arrived


Jimi Wikman
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After months of waiting, Angular 9 is finally here. This is a major release that effect the entire platform. This includes the framework, Angular Material, and the CLI. The most notable change is Ivy, the new default compiler and runtime.

Version 9 moves all applications to use the Ivy compiler and runtime by default. Ivy improves bundle size, allows for better debugging, adds improved type checking, faster testing, enables the AOT compiler on by default, and improves CSS class and style binding. With Ivy, both small apps and large apps will see largely improved bundle size savings.

abgular 9 ivy savings.png

Rather than me repeating the official announcement, I will let Maximilian Schwarzmüller from Academind walk you through the changes in this great video.

 


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