Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

6 Screenshots

About This File

We go over transitional and producing workflows, designing issue types and how to divide projects into a scalable solution that also can be used for SAFe.  Stockholm AUG Leader Jimi Wikman show the setup he has built based on his experience as a  project leader, release manager, designer, front end developer, requirement analyst and tester. He show his best tricks on what works in small and large scale organizations based on his experiences as a Jira expert.

Prepare for a provocative and inspiring session where we dive into the 4 design principles for a sustainable, flexible and controlled Jira that works.

For real.


User Feedback

You may only provide a review once you have downloaded the file.

There are no reviews to display.

  • Similar Content

    • By Jimi Wikman
      Regardless if you work in a continuous delivery flow like Kanban, a sequential delivery flow like waterfall or an iterative delivery flow like Scrum, you will benefit greatly from having portfolio management. Having a dedicated funnel ensures that you get a proper overlook of your incoming request. In this article we will discuss how that can be done by creating a process for it in Jira Software.
      Advanced Roadmaps is a very useful tool because it allows us to get the big picture. It also allows us to scale the hierarchies in Jira for issue types. This is important because the standard hierarchies are designed for teams, so they do not scale well. While you can work around this using the sideways approach where you have the higher hierarchies in a separate project and link between them, that is not really a hierarchy. This also works poorly when you wish to display things in Advanced Roadmap.
      The first thing we need to do for a proper hierarchy view in Advanced Roadmaps is to define the portfolio levels. We need to accommodate for multiple scenarios as requests, or demands, often come in different forms. The most common types are projects or even programs, or new features. We also want to make sure we can work with the different frameworks out there, so we add a collaboration level as well as defined in SAFe.
      To avoid a lot of confusion between different frameworks and other tools, we rename the Epic issue type in Jira Software to Feature. It will not be perfect, but it will have to do until we get the ability to rename it properly when Atlassian makes that change in the future.  We do this by going to Issues -> Issue Types and edit the Epic issue type. We also add two new issue types for Initiative and Capability.
      Next we go to Plans -> Settings -> Advanced Roadmaps hierarchy configuration. There we add two new levels called Initiative and Capability and map them with our newly created issue types with the same names. Finally, we rename the Epic to Feature, and we should have our first hierarchy defined. We can go back and adjust this later if we want. The setup should now look like this:

      We can now add this to our projects by adding the issue types to our Issue Type Schemas. Depending on your setup you may want the new issue types for Initiative and Capability to exist in a separate Issue Type Schema, or you will add them to the standard schema. Either way we still need to give the new issue type a workflow that match their purpose. So we head over to Issues -> Workflows and create a new workflow.
      Again we want to consider what the purpose of these issue types is and who will actually work with them. Initiative, Capability and Feature are all used by management and requirement analysts to provide information on how to realize demands. That means that we do not have the same transfer of responsibility as for User Stories. Instead, we need to consider what we actually do in the portfolio and what we need to track in terms of activities.
      SAFe have a pretty good example of this for their Portfolio Kanban. Their first step is Funnel and for us that is pretty much everything that comes into our workflow, and we define this as new. Anything that comes in to the portfolio needs to be reviewed to see what we should focus on next. Since we will not review everything we add two steps for the review process: Ready for Review and In Review. This allows us to only pick things that we want to review by moving them from new to Ready for Review, and then we have an active status to indicate that we are working on this.
      We do the same for Analysis, which is the step where we involve Business Analysts and Requirement Analysts to define the need in more detail. For this we add Ready for Analysis for when the Review process lead to us spending time to break down the need in a requirement process. We also add the In Analysis to indicate that it has entered the Requirement process.
      Before we close this workflow we add the Implementation process as well. Ready for Implementation indicate that the requirement process has led to a decision to implement and In Implementation indicate that the need is being fulfilled. We do not fracture this further as we can easily drill down to individual tasks in Advanced Roadmaps, and it is not really useful to have for example test and release part of this workflow. That is because each issue type will have many issue types below it, and you can only transition on the last sub-task, making it misleading and feeling stagnant.
      Finally, we add a status for Blocked/Pending to allow us to track when things are preventing this activity from being fulfilled. This can be external or internal dependencies or financial reasons for example.
      As always we go for an open workflow to allow for free transitions. We add a close screen to the Close status to set a resolution and then add a post function to remove resolution on all other statuses. This workflow should now look like this:

      The final step is now to go to our workflow scheme and add this new workflow. We do this by going to Issues -> Workflow Schemes and click edit on the workflows scheme we have Initiative, Capability and Feature added to. We click add Workflow and add the new workflow we just created. Then we select that this workflow will be applied to Initiative, Capability and Feature before hitting save.
      This should now allow you to work inside Advanced Roadmaps using Initiatives, Capabilities and Features in a proper portfolio management process that allow for larger projects and programs as well as manage smaller feature or even user stories.
      I hope you found this useful and as always, if you have any questions just write a comment and I will do my best to help you.
    • By Jimi Wikman
      Regardless if you work in a continuous delivery flow like Kanban, a sequential delivery flow like waterfall or an iterative delivery flow like Scrum, you will benefit greatly from having portfolio management. Having a dedicated funnel ensures that you get a proper overlook of your incoming request. In this article we will discuss how that can be done by creating a process for it in Jira Software.
      Advanced Roadmaps is a very useful tool because it allows us to get the big picture. It also allows us to scale the hierarchies in Jira for issue types. This is important because the standard hierarchies are designed for teams, so they do not scale well. While you can work around this using the sideways approach where you have the higher hierarchies in a separate project and link between them, that is not really a hierarchy. This also works poorly when you wish to display things in Advanced Roadmap.
      The first thing we need to do for a proper hierarchy view in Advanced Roadmaps is to define the portfolio levels. We need to accommodate for multiple scenarios as requests, or demands, often come in different forms. The most common types are projects or even programs, or new features. We also want to make sure we can work with the different frameworks out there, so we add a collaboration level as well as defined in SAFe.
      To avoid a lot of confusion between different frameworks and other tools, we rename the Epic issue type in Jira Software to Feature. It will not be perfect, but it will have to do until we get the ability to rename it properly when Atlassian makes that change in the future.  We do this by going to Issues -> Issue Types and edit the Epic issue type. We also add two new issue types for Initiative and Capability.
      Next we go to Plans -> Settings -> Advanced Roadmaps hierarchy configuration. There we add two new levels called Initiative and Capability and map them with our newly created issue types with the same names. Finally, we rename the Epic to Feature, and we should have our first hierarchy defined. We can go back and adjust this later if we want. The setup should now look like this:

      We can now add this to our projects by adding the issue types to our Issue Type Schemas. Depending on your setup you may want the new issue types for Initiative and Capability to exist in a separate Issue Type Schema, or you will add them to the standard schema. Either way we still need to give the new issue type a workflow that match their purpose. So we head over to Issues -> Workflows and create a new workflow.
      Again we want to consider what the purpose of these issue types is and who will actually work with them. Initiative, Capability and Feature are all used by management and requirement analysts to provide information on how to realize demands. That means that we do not have the same transfer of responsibility as for User Stories. Instead, we need to consider what we actually do in the portfolio and what we need to track in terms of activities.
      SAFe have a pretty good example of this for their Portfolio Kanban. Their first step is Funnel and for us that is pretty much everything that comes into our workflow, and we define this as new. Anything that comes in to the portfolio needs to be reviewed to see what we should focus on next. Since we will not review everything we add two steps for the review process: Ready for Review and In Review. This allows us to only pick things that we want to review by moving them from new to Ready for Review, and then we have an active status to indicate that we are working on this.
      We do the same for Analysis, which is the step where we involve Business Analysts and Requirement Analysts to define the need in more detail. For this we add Ready for Analysis for when the Review process lead to us spending time to break down the need in a requirement process. We also add the In Analysis to indicate that it has entered the Requirement process.
      Before we close this workflow we add the Implementation process as well. Ready for Implementation indicate that the requirement process has led to a decision to implement and In Implementation indicate that the need is being fulfilled. We do not fracture this further as we can easily drill down to individual tasks in Advanced Roadmaps, and it is not really useful to have for example test and release part of this workflow. That is because each issue type will have many issue types below it, and you can only transition on the last sub-task, making it misleading and feeling stagnant.
      Finally, we add a status for Blocked/Pending to allow us to track when things are preventing this activity from being fulfilled. This can be external or internal dependencies or financial reasons for example.
      As always we go for an open workflow to allow for free transitions. We add a close screen to the Close status to set a resolution and then add a post function to remove resolution on all other statuses. This workflow should now look like this:

      The final step is now to go to our workflow scheme and add this new workflow. We do this by going to Issues -> Workflow Schemes and click edit on the workflows scheme we have Initiative, Capability and Feature added to. We click add Workflow and add the new workflow we just created. Then we select that this workflow will be applied to Initiative, Capability and Feature before hitting save.
      This should now allow you to work inside Advanced Roadmaps using Initiatives, Capabilities and Features in a proper portfolio management process that allow for larger projects and programs as well as manage smaller feature or even user stories.
      I hope you found this useful and as always, if you have any questions just write a comment and I will do my best to help you.

      View full blog article
    • By Jimi Wikman
      My assignment is to set up, configure and design an Atlassian setup as a proof of concept for the new work processes.
    • By Jimi Wikman
      This is a repost from Atlassian's blog where the latest updates to the Atlassian cloud platform is posted. It is reposted here since the Atlassian blog does not have an RSS feed and so we can discuss the changes to the Atlassian Cloud architecture. You can follow these posts withe the tag "atlassian cloud changes".
      Atlassian Cloud
      Your cloud-hosted products are supported by the Atlassian Cloud platform. This section usually includes changes related to multiple Atlassian Cloud products, site administration, and user management.
      Email users with suggested account changes 
      From the Change details button, you can suggest that a user changes their account details to make their profile more consistent and easier to identify. Read more about administering Atlassian accounts.
      Give your users a Trusted permission 
      From a user's Permission options, select Trusted to give certain users more responsibility. These users will be able to install and configure new products on your site and invite new users themselves.
      Claim accounts after verifying a domain 
      To start managing accounts on your domain, we’ve included an additional step that requires you to claim accounts after verifying that you own the domain. From the table on the Domains page, click Claim accounts next to the verified domain. Read more about verifying a domain.
       
      Jira platform
      Changes in this section usually apply to all Jira products. We'll tell you in the change description if something is only for a specific Jira product.
      Need help with next-gen projects or service desks? Try searching for what you need  
      We’ve improved how to get help with your next-gen project or service desk. We’ve moved our documentation into Jira Software and Jira Service Desk to help you find relevant help to your questions.
      To search for help content in next-gen projects or service desks:
      If not already there, navigate to your next-gen project or service desk. From the navigation bar, select Help. When you reach out for help, Jira will suggest relevant content based on the screen you’re currently viewing. To find other help, use the search bar.
      Next-gen: Epic panel in backlog 
      You can now manage epics on the backlog of your next-gen project via the Epics panel, similar to how epic management works in classic Jira Software projects. Changes you make in the panel on the backlog will reflect on the Roadmap, and vice-versa.
      Find issues you've recently worked on 
      We’ve added a new Worked on tab to the Your work page. This tab lets you quickly find and resume work on issues you’ve updated recently. Head to Your work > Worked on to get started.
      Improved navigation in Jira Cloud 
      We’ve created an improved navigation experience that always appears at the top of the screen, with clearly labeled buttons and menus to help you search, create, and resume your work. Find out more about our improved navigation experience and when you can try it out.
      New issue view: Improved date formatting in the history feed
      Dates in the history are now more consistent. They’ll correctly show when changes happened relative to your time zone and be translated into the language you’ve chosen for Jira.
      Select your email notifications for issue activity from personal settings
      Jira sends email notifications when certain activities occur on issues. In your personal settings, you can now choose whether you want these notifications. If you do, you can toggle notifications for issue activity when you’re a watcher, reporter, assignee on an issue, when someone mentions you, and when you make changes to an issue. Learn more about choosing email notifications.
      Issue collector no longer matches the submitter's user session to make them the reporter 
      We’ve adapted our issue collectors to the Chrome browser’s new cookie security features, but have had to change how they work. The issue collector no longer matches a submitter’s user session to make them the reporter. You can still match them by email address.
      To improve issue security, project and issue keys are no longer displayed in the success message after submitting feedback on an issue collector (unless the project is open to anyone on the web).
      Learn more about using the issue collector.
       
      Jira Software
      We're rolling out a new type of project known as next-gen. By default, any Jira Software licensed user can create their own next-gen project. These projects don't affect existing Jira projects, shared configurations, or your schemes. You can manage who's allowed to create next-gen projects with the new Create independent projects global permission. Read more about next-gen projects.
      GitHub app on the Atlassian Marketplace 
      We've partnered with GitHub to build a new and improved integration, which you can install at the Atlassian Marketplace. This replaces the DVCS connector in Jira's system settings. Current GitHub integrations set up under the old method will continue to work, but new integrations must be set up using the app on the Atlassian Marketplace. We're rolling out this update gradually, so it may not be on your Jira Cloud site yet.
      This won't affect GitHub Enterprise integrations, which must still be set up via the DVCS connector.
      Kanban boards just got faster 
      Is your team so productive, their 'Done' column is always overflowing? Too many issues on a board can slow it down and make you scroll way too much. To fix this, we’re bringing what we’ve codenamed “Fast Kanban”—a way to keep your board fresh and clean, and as quick as a flash.
      The idea behind it is simple. The ‘Done’ column will now show only issues that have been updated (in any way) in the last 2 weeks, hiding the rest. Less noise on your board means happier teams. Any project admin can change the retention period, or choose to display all issues, if they prefer. Learn more
      Quickly copy a link to an issue in your next-gen project backlog 
      When viewing your backlog, you can now copy a link to an issue to your clipboard. To try it out:
      Navigate to your next-gen project backlog. Locate the issue you want a link for. Select More (…) > Copy issue link. The link to the issue is copied to your clipboard, ready for you to paste into a Confluence page, Slack message, or anywhere you might want to share your issue’s link.
       
      Jira Service Desk
      New issue view for Jira Service Desk 
      The new issue view groups key actions and information in a logical way, making it easier for you to scan and update requests. Learn more about the new issue view.
      Use keyboard shortcuts in your queues
      Use keyboard shortcuts to navigate around your queues and get your work done faster. You can now move through issues, select their fields, and go to the issue view from your queues just by using your keyboard!
      Remind agents to update empty fields when moving a request in your next-gen service desk 
      We added another rule to your next-gen service desk workflows. Now, you can prompt your agents to complete an empty field when they use a specific transition to change an issue’s status. The rule removes a burden on your teams to remember to fill in specific fields until they matter. It keeps them focused on the important work of helping your customers.
      To learn more about the rule, and get an example of how to use it, check out our complete documentation on next-gen workflow rules.
       
      Confluence
      You can now create spaces on Android mobile  
      Android users can now create spaces on-the-go in the Confluence mobile app. You can find this action in the overflow menu (•••) in the top right corner of the app.
      Your editing experience just got an upgrade 
      The new Confluence editor allows anyone to create beautiful, powerful pages effortlessly. Check out the editor roadmap to learn more.
      End of support for nested tables 
      As we work on creating a more stable editing experience, we will no longer support nested tables - that is, a table within a list, block quotes, or another table. Existing nested tables will not be affected, you simply won't be able to create new nested tables.
      We're extending editing improvements to all pages on Android 
      The editing improvements we made to blogs a few months ago are coming to the rest of your Android mobile pages, too. In addition to being faster and more reliable, your new pages are also responsive, optimized for readability, and have advanced tables. Some macros are still missing as we rebuild them, but you can check the list of changes and track updates to macros on our docs site.
      Jira issue URLs are converted to smart links 
      When you paste a Jira issue link into a Confluence page, the URL is converted to a smart link that displays the page icon and the page title. This works if the Jira and Confluence sites are linked or if they are both cloud versions.
      Convert pages to use the new editor 
      You can now convert your existing pages that were created using the legacy editor to use the new editing experience! Learn more
      Confluence navigation just got better 
      Get to information faster with improved navigation – making what you need visible from anywhere in Confluence. Learn more
      Portfolio for Jira plan macro 
      The Portfolio for Jira plan Confluence macro lets you embed a Portfolio for Jira Server and Data Center plan in a Confluence page. Join key stakeholders in the spaces where business goals are built and tracked, and share how work is progressing across multiple projects and teams.
       
      Bitbucket
      A merge checklist has been added to the right sidebar of the new pull request experience 
      In the new pull request experience, you can now view any merge checks via the sidebar located on the right side of a pull request. Merge checks allow admins to recommend (on standard plan) or require (on premium plan) specific conditions on merges for individual branches or branch patterns. Merge checks work in tandem with branch permissions to give your team flexibility and control over your development workflow.
      New Code Review - Limit the amount of rendered diff content 
      Limits the amount of pull request content rendered in the diff and file tree to improve browser performance. Limits include the overall number of files and number of lines for the entire diff. Learn more
      Diff comment replies limited to one level of indentation
      In the new code review experience, replies to diff comments are now limited to one level of indentation, meaning all replies are still displayed but they are all at the same level of alignment. Along with the updated display, Bitbucket Cloud now auto-populates the @mention of the person to whom you are replying.
      Enable git clone options at step level 
      You can now enable git clone options at a step level. Check out the docs to learn more.

      View full blog article
    • By Jimi Wikman
      Automation in Jira have long been requested by the customers and now it is finally here for all Jira Cloud customers. This new feature is actually not new, but it is the popular Automation for Jira app that was purchased by Atlassian in 2019. Not only is this an amazing addition, it is also completely free for all Jira Cloud users.
      Automation for Jira was purchased by Atlassian back in October 2019 and in March 2020 the automation functionality was made available natively to every single Jira Cloud instance at every tier. In late March the first DevOps triggers was released with the promise of new functionality coming soon. For server users there is still the old app for now.
      With the new automation feature that is built into Jira Cloud you can now automate a lot of actions. Not only will this free up time for you and your team, it is also super easy to setup with no coding what so ever!
      This is pretty impressive of course, but when you extend this across other products like Bitbucket and Github, then you get something very nice indeed. I have used the Automation for Jira app before and really liked it's simple, yet powerful features. It is really, really good that this now comes as a standard feature for all Jira Cloud customers.

       

      View full blog article
×
×
  • Create New...