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    • By Jimi Wikman
      Object orientation (OO) is not a trendy concept anymore, but it hasn’t certainly lost it values. The purpose of the book “Growing Object-Oriented Software, Guided by Tests” is to integrate the development of object-oriented software with the Agile testing Test-Driven Development (TDD) approach, more specifically in Java. It starts with an introduction to TDD and the open source testing tools (Junit, jMock2) that will be used in the examples. Then, it describes in detail the TDD process that is then illustrated by a large example. The book ends with more software testing topics like tests smells or tests readability. A final part is dedicated to special aspects of testing Java code like persistence, threads and asynchronous code. The book “Growing Object-Oriented Software, Guided by Tests” written by Steve Freeman and Nat Pryce could be read from start to end or be used as a reference book. In the preface, the authors say that the book is intended for developers with professional experience and some first knowledge of TDD. It really goes far beyond “toy” examples that you can find in programming learning books to write your first “Hello Word” program. The content is a balanced mix of concepts, examples and diagrams that makes it easy to read. Besides what could be considered “catchy” acronyms (OO+TDD), this book is an excellent reference on how to design and program software (the authors use the nice concept of “growing” software). I will consider this book as a must-read for anyone programming in Java, [...] The post Growing Object-Oriented Software, Guided by Tests first appeared on Software Testing Magazine.
    • By Jimi Wikman
      User Acceptance Testing (UAT) is the final stage of any software development life cycle. This is when actual users test the software to see if it is able to carry out the required tasks it was designed to address in real-world situations. UAT tests adherence to customers’ requirements. UAT testers aim to validate changes that were made against original requirements.
    • By Jimi Wikman
      In every single organization I have worked in so far, it has been the policy for Scrum Masters to work with a minimum of two teams simultaneously. I have even seen Scrum Masters “serving” as many as six teams.
      Serving multiple teams could be beneficial in the sense that those teams are aligned on “the Scrum language they speak”. It’s part of the Scrum Master’s accountability to teach teams and organizations in their adoption of the Scrum framework.
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