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    • By Jimi Wikman
      A walkthrough and guide on how to create and configure a board in Jira Software Cloud.
      0:00 - Intro 0:24 - What is a board? 01:27 - Two types of boards 02:10 - Jira without a board 02:41 - Create a board in Jira Software Cloud 04:50 - What is Roadmaps in Jira Software Cloud? 05:01 - What is a backlog in Jira Software Cloud? 06:02 - What is Active Sprints in Jira Software Cloud? 06:35 - General Boards Settings explained for Jira Software Cloud 08:52 - Column settings for Boards in Jira Software Cloud 09:02 - Column restraints for Boards in Jira Software Cloud 10:35 - Mange Columns in your Jira Software Cloud board 13:12 - Configure Swimlanes for your board in Jira Software Cloud 14:52 - Setup Quick filters for your board in Jira Software Cloud 17:22 - Card colors explained for your board in Jira Software Cloud 18:58 - Card layout explained for your board in Jira Software Cloud 21:23 - How to set up estimation for your board in Jira Software Cloud 23:08 - Working days for your board in Jira Software Cloud 23:57 - Issue Detail View explained for your board in Jira Software Cloud 25:17 - Configure Roadmaps for your board in Jira Software Cloud 26:22 - Outro
    • By Jimi Wikman
      Atlassian are raising the prices for their cloud services on October 12th, which is perfectly ok. What is a bit strange though is that they for some reason seem to purposely try to hide just how much they are raising the prices. It does not say in the email, and the link takes you to the FAQ rather than the price list. A price list that only have the new prices and not the old for comparison. It is a bit odd.
      This seems to become a norm for Atlassian lately, to hide information and prevent comparison. I don't like it and I don't like the direction Atlassian is taking in terms of communication and information in the last few years. Atlassian used to be good and open about their prices, but lately it feels that they are doing everything they can to obfuscate and hide information purposely.
      I am not sure if that is because they have a strategy to adopt dark patterns in their UX to prevent a clear view into the actual costs (like airlines do), or if it is just some bad practice on their part implemented by someone who don't understand the customers.
      For example, why not include the new pricing in the email you send out to the customers? You know what products the customer own as it is part of your database, so it is not rocket science to add customized templates based on product ownership. If people could do that 15 years ago when sending out printed catalogs that had your car and your color on the front page, then I am sure that Atlassian can set up a simple database that can send targeted content to product segments.
      Even if you can't because you have not done the work, or your master data is crap, you can still send the entire pricing table, or at least link to it!  Instead, you send out a letter that say nothing with a link to a page that does not have the pricing information I am looking for.
       
      Not even the FAQ landing page that Atlassian link to have a link in the text or any form of directional que to the single most important question clients will have when landing here: What are the new prices. Sure, there is a link component to the left, but nothing that indicate that these are related to the new pricing structure. It's just sloppy and poor UX in my opinion.

      Once you click in to see the pricing tables, you would expect to see the new prices and the old one for comparison, right? Nope. Atlassian shows only the new prices. If you are anything like me, then you never really pay attention to the actual price per tier, you know your monthly cost, right? So it would be nice with a place to see your new cost based on the new prices... but nope. You just have to wait for the next bill to see what the new price might be.

      As you can see, the start plans are going to be shafted once more. So if you have one, hold on to it because it looks like they will increase the price on that tier with 750%.
       
      Now, it is not very difficult to present the information on the increase in a more useful way. Just add the information on both the old and new price, along with the changes in both value and percentage. This is what Jira Cloud Standard looks like, for example, if you spend 2 minutes on it:

       
      I think this could be a problem because the person in charge of the INFORMATION is a designer used to work with PRESENTATION. Having tables that look good is one thing, answering the questions of the people looking for answers is another. If you present new prices that will affect people's decision to remain a client or not, then you better do better than this Atlassian.
      This was not good, so step it up.
      Ok?
    • By Jimi Wikman
      Atlassian are raising the prices for their cloud services on October 12th, which is perfectly ok. What is a bit strange though is that they for some reason seem to purposely try to hide just how much they are raising the prices. It does not say in the email, and the link takes you to the FAQ rather than the price list. A price list that only have the new prices and not the old for comparison. It is a bit odd.
      This seems to become a norm for Atlassian lately, to hide information and prevent comparison. I don't like it and I don't like the direction Atlassian is taking in terms of communication and information in the last few years. Atlassian used to be good and open about their prices, but lately it feels that they are doing everything they can to obfuscate and hide information purposely.
      I am not sure if that is because they have a strategy to adopt dark patterns in their UX to prevent a clear view into the actual costs (like airlines do), or if it is just some bad practice on their part implemented by someone who don't understand the customers.
      For example, why not include the new pricing in the email you send out to the customers? You know what products the customer own as it is part of your database, so it is not rocket science to add customized templates based on product ownership. If people could do that 15 years ago when sending out printed catalogs that had your car and your color on the front page, then I am sure that Atlassian can set up a simple database that can send targeted content to product segments.
      Even if you can't because you have not done the work, or your master data is crap, you can still send the entire pricing table, or at least link to it!  Instead, you send out a letter that say nothing with a link to a page that does not have the pricing information I am looking for.
       
      Not even the FAQ landing page that Atlassian link to have a link in the text or any form of directional que to the single most important question clients will have when landing here: What are the new prices. Sure, there is a link component to the left, but nothing that indicate that these are related to the new pricing structure. It's just sloppy and poor UX in my opinion.

      Once you click in to see the pricing tables, you would expect to see the new prices and the old one for comparison, right? Nope. Atlassian shows only the new prices. If you are anything like me, then you never really pay attention to the actual price per tier, you know your monthly cost, right? So it would be nice with a place to see your new cost based on the new prices... but nope. You just have to wait for the next bill to see what the new price might be.

      As you can see, the start plans are going to be shafted once more. So if you have one, hold on to it because it looks like they will increase the price on that tier with 750%.
       
      Now, it is not very difficult to present the information on the increase in a more useful way. Just add the information on both the old and new price, along with the changes in both value and percentage. This is what Jira Cloud Standard looks like, for example, if you spend 2 minutes on it:

       
      I think this could be a problem because the person in charge of the INFORMATION is a designer used to work with PRESENTATION. Having tables that look good is one thing, answering the questions of the people looking for answers is another. If you present new prices that will affect people's decision to remain a client or not, then you better do better than this Atlassian.
      This was not good, so step it up.
      Ok?

      View full blog article
    • By Jimi Wikman
      You may have spotted a UX writer in the wild before — flighty creatures that flutter between teams, dipping into spreadsheets, copy decks or design documents as they sing about title case, contractions and other… well, arcane topics.
      Most of us would agree that it’s good to have somebody to “look after the words” — but where and when should a UX writer get involved in the design process?
      Short answer: everywhere — and early!
    • By Jimi Wikman
      My assignment was to make a new design for the web based user area based on the graphical profile from one of ChessIT's clients. The design had to be light in terms of changes, as the project had hard deadlines. I worked with the client and the developers to find a balance between the two that satisfied the requirements and respected the time constraints.
      I also worked with ChessIT to create new icons for their solution and create a design guide for future design work. Furthermore, I assisted with designing a signup form for another client. I also designed the UI for a second system for that same client. These designs I then also ended up coding as well, with focus on CSS and HTML structures.
      Deliverables in the project:
      Design in Sketch and later in Figma Client meetings to discuss the designs A new UI for a signup form for another client A new UI for a second system design HTML/CSS for the signup form and the second system Custom Icons Design guideline
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