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  • Atlassian Cloud changes Mar 30 to Apr 6, 2020 | jimiwikman.se

    Atlassian Cloud changes Mar 30 to Apr 6, 2020

    Posted , 353 views, 0 comments

    This is a repost from Atlassian's blog where the latest updates to the Atlassian cloud platform is posted. It is reposted here since the Atlassian blog does not have an RSS feed and so we can discuss the changes to the Atlassian Cloud architecture. You can follow these posts withe the tag "atlassian cloud changes".

    Atlassian Cloud

    Your cloud-hosted products are supported by the Atlassian Cloud platform. This section usually includes changes related to multiple Atlassian Cloud products, site administration, and user management.

    Email users with suggested account changes rolling out icon.png

    From the Change details button, you can suggest that a user changes their account details to make their profile more consistent and easier to identify. Read more about administering Atlassian accounts.

    Give your users a Trusted permission rolling out icon.png

    From a user's Permission options, select Trusted to give certain users more responsibility. These users will be able to install and configure new products on your site and invite new users themselves.

    Claim accounts after verifying a domain rolling out icon.png

    To start managing accounts on your domain, we’ve included an additional step that requires you to claim accounts after verifying that you own the domain. From the table on the Domains page, click Claim accounts next to the verified domain. Read more about verifying a domain.

     

    Jira platform

    Changes in this section usually apply to all Jira products. We'll tell you in the change description if something is only for a specific Jira product.

    Need help with next-gen projects or service desks? Try searching for what you need rolling out icon.png new this week¨.png

    We’ve improved how to get help with your next-gen project or service desk. We’ve moved our documentation into Jira Software and Jira Service Desk to help you find relevant help to your questions.

    To search for help content in next-gen projects or service desks:

    1. If not already there, navigate to your next-gen project or service desk.
    2. From the navigation bar, select (question)Help.

    When you reach out for help, Jira will suggest relevant content based on the screen you’re currently viewing. To find other help, use the search bar.

    Next-gen: Epic panel in backlog rolling out icon.png

    You can now manage epics on the backlog of your next-gen project via the Epics panel, similar to how epic management works in classic Jira Software projects. Changes you make in the panel on the backlog will reflect on the Roadmap, and vice-versa.

    Find issues you've recently worked on rolling out icon.png

    We’ve added a new Worked on tab to the Your work page. This tab lets you quickly find and resume work on issues you’ve updated recently. Head to Your work > Worked on to get started.

    Improved navigation in Jira Cloud rolling out icon.png

    We’ve created an improved navigation experience that always appears at the top of the screen, with clearly labeled buttons and menus to help you search, create, and resume your work. Find out more about our improved navigation experience and when you can try it out.

    New issue view: Improved date formatting in the history feed

    Dates in the history are now more consistent. They’ll correctly show when changes happened relative to your time zone and be translated into the language you’ve chosen for Jira.

    Select your email notifications for issue activity from personal settings

    Jira sends email notifications when certain activities occur on issues. In your personal settings, you can now choose whether you want these notifications. If you do, you can toggle notifications for issue activity when you’re a watcher, reporter, assignee on an issue, when someone mentions you, and when you make changes to an issue. Learn more about choosing email notifications.

    Issue collector no longer matches the submitter's user session to make them the reporter rolling out icon.png

    We’ve adapted our issue collectors to the Chrome browser’s new cookie security features, but have had to change how they work. The issue collector no longer matches a submitter’s user session to make them the reporter. You can still match them by email address.

    To improve issue security, project and issue keys are no longer displayed in the success message after submitting feedback on an issue collector (unless the project is open to anyone on the web).

    Learn more about using the issue collector.

     

    Jira Software

    We're rolling out a new type of project known as next-gen. By default, any Jira Software licensed user can create their own next-gen project. These projects don't affect existing Jira projects, shared configurations, or your schemes. You can manage who's allowed to create next-gen projects with the new Create independent projects global permission. Read more about next-gen projects.

    GitHub app on the Atlassian Marketplace rolling out icon.png

    We've partnered with GitHub to build a new and improved integration, which you can install at the Atlassian Marketplace. This replaces the DVCS connector in Jira's system settings. Current GitHub integrations set up under the old method will continue to work, but new integrations must be set up using the app on the Atlassian Marketplace. We're rolling out this update gradually, so it may not be on your Jira Cloud site yet.

    This won't affect GitHub Enterprise integrations, which must still be set up via the DVCS connector.

    Kanban boards just got faster rolling out icon.png

    Is your team so productive, their 'Done' column is always overflowing? Too many issues on a board can slow it down and make you scroll way too much. To fix this, we’re bringing what we’ve codenamed “Fast Kanban”—a way to keep your board fresh and clean, and as quick as a flash.

    The idea behind it is simple. The ‘Done’ column will now show only issues that have been updated (in any way) in the last 2 weeks, hiding the rest. Less noise on your board means happier teams. Any project admin can change the retention period, or choose to display all issues, if they prefer. Learn more

    Quickly copy a link to an issue in your next-gen project backlog rolling out icon.png

    When viewing your backlog, you can now copy a link to an issue to your clipboard. To try it out:

    1. Navigate to your next-gen project backlog.
    2. Locate the issue you want a link for.
    3. Select More () > Copy issue link.

    The link to the issue is copied to your clipboard, ready for you to paste into a Confluence page, Slack message, or anywhere you might want to share your issue’s link.

     

    Jira Service Desk

    New issue view for Jira Service Desk rolling out icon.png

    The new issue view groups key actions and information in a logical way, making it easier for you to scan and update requests. Learn more about the new issue view.

    Use keyboard shortcuts in your queues

    Use keyboard shortcuts to navigate around your queues and get your work done faster. You can now move through issues, select their fields, and go to the issue view from your queues just by using your keyboard!

    Remind agents to update empty fields when moving a request in your next-gen service desk rolling out icon.png

    We added another rule to your next-gen service desk workflows. Now, you can prompt your agents to complete an empty field when they use a specific transition to change an issue’s status. The rule removes a burden on your teams to remember to fill in specific fields until they matter. It keeps them focused on the important work of helping your customers.

    To learn more about the rule, and get an example of how to use it, check out our complete documentation on next-gen workflow rules.

     

    Confluence

    You can now create spaces on Android mobile rolling out icon.png new this week¨.png

    Android users can now create spaces on-the-go in the Confluence mobile app. You can find this action in the overflow menu (•••) in the top right corner of the app.

    Your editing experience just got an upgrade rolling out icon.png

    The new Confluence editor allows anyone to create beautiful, powerful pages effortlessly. Check out the editor roadmap to learn more.

    End of support for nested tables rolling out icon.png

    As we work on creating a more stable editing experience, we will no longer support nested tables - that is, a table within a list, block quotes, or another table. Existing nested tables will not be affected, you simply won't be able to create new nested tables.

    We're extending editing improvements to all pages on Android rolling out icon.png

    The editing improvements we made to blogs a few months ago are coming to the rest of your Android mobile pages, too. In addition to being faster and more reliable, your new pages are also responsive, optimized for readability, and have advanced tables. Some macros are still missing as we rebuild them, but you can check the list of changes and track updates to macros on our docs site.

    Jira issue URLs are converted to smart links rolling out icon.png

    When you paste a Jira issue link into a Confluence page, the URL is converted to a smart link that displays the page icon and the page title. This works if the Jira and Confluence sites are linked or if they are both cloud versions.

    Convert pages to use the new editor rolling out icon.png

    You can now convert your existing pages that were created using the legacy editor to use the new editing experience! Learn more

    Confluence navigation just got better rolling out icon.png

    Get to information faster with improved navigation – making what you need visible from anywhere in Confluence. Learn more

    Portfolio for Jira plan macro rolling out icon.png

    The Portfolio for Jira plan Confluence macro lets you embed a Portfolio for Jira Server and Data Center plan in a Confluence page. Join key stakeholders in the spaces where business goals are built and tracked, and share how work is progressing across multiple projects and teams.

     

    Bitbucket

    A merge checklist has been added to the right sidebar of the new pull request experience new this week¨.png

    In the new pull request experience, you can now view any merge checks via the sidebar located on the right side of a pull request. Merge checks allow admins to recommend (on standard plan) or require (on premium plan) specific conditions on merges for individual branches or branch patterns. Merge checks work in tandem with branch permissions to give your team flexibility and control over your development workflow.

    New Code Review - Limit the amount of rendered diff content rolling out icon.png

    Limits the amount of pull request content rendered in the diff and file tree to improve browser performance. Limits include the overall number of files and number of lines for the entire diff. Learn more

    Diff comment replies limited to one level of indentation

    In the new code review experience, replies to diff comments are now limited to one level of indentation, meaning all replies are still displayed but they are all at the same level of alignment. Along with the updated display, Bitbucket Cloud now auto-populates the @mention of the person to whom you are replying.

    Enable git clone options at step level rolling out icon.png

    You can now enable git clone options at a step level. Check out the docs to learn more.

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    • By Jimi Wikman
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      This series will be divided into several parts. This is because adding every step in a single post would make for a very long blog post. Dividing into a series also make it easier for you to look at specific parts that is most interesting for you at the moment. The parts that I have in mind could change as I write the series, but at the moment the plan is this:
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    • By Jimi Wikman
      In the previous articles we have defined what tool to use for what and what issue types we need. New it's time to define the workflows for those issue types. Before we can do that however we should first define what workflows are and how we should use them in Jira.
      Three types of workflows
      In short we can narrow down workflows to three types: sequential, state machine and rules driven workflows.
      Sequential workflow
      This workflow is usually chart based from one step to the next, always moving forward without ever going back. Each step depends on the completion of the activities on the previous step. You can think of this workflow as a connect the dots system: you have to follow the numbers correctly, one after the other, to complete the big picture.
      State Machine Workflow
      This type of workflow can be considered like puzzle solving, in which you’re constantly putting important pieces in place to complete a project. State machine workflow are frequently used when there are creative elements in the process, or products and services that require extra review or input from clients and management.
      Rules-driven Workflow
      This workflow is executed based on a sequential workflow with rules that dictate the progress of the workflow. This can be compared to following a blueprint to make one complete structure. Rules driven workflows are very useful when working on a variety of projects with clear goals but varying levels of specifications.
      We should also define what a workflow is NOT:
      A workflows is NOT a process - A process is more then just a workflow as it includes data, forms, reports, actors and more. A workflow usually span over multiple processes as we hand over responsibility between different capabilities (requirement, development, test, acceptance).
        A workflow is NOT a list of unconnected tasks - Unconnected tasks are task management and not a workflow.
        A workflow is NOT a checklist - Checklists are binary. It's either done or not done. That is not a workflow.
        A workflow is NOT a state diagram - This is probably the biggest issue I see when people try to design workflows. The idea that you need to track every single state in a workflow comes from a misunderstanding of who we actually build workflows for and what they actually need.  
      "A state machine (panel (a)) performs actions in response to explicit events. In contrast, the flowchart (panel (b)) does not need explicit events but rather transitions from node to node in its graph automatically upon completion of activities." - Wikipedia


       
      Who do we build workflows for?
      In order to understand why state diagrams are not the best choice to design workflows in Jira we should understand who we build workflows for and what purpose they serve.
      The reason we use Jira is because we  want a good way to define and assign work. We also need a way to oversee, or manage, the work. This means that we want a way to track what work we are doing, what the current status is on that work and who is responsible for completing the work at the moment.
      So for developers and testers we want en easy way to see what is ready to be worked on, what is being worked on and and what have we completed. For managers we need the same, but over the whole chain of responsibility. We also want to connect the work to the need so we can follow up when the need is being fulfilled.
      So we have two basic need to fulfill:
      What is ready for me to work on? Are we on track to fulfill the need or do I need to take action? In the previous article we mentioned transitional and producing items when defining what issue types we need. We can match these theories with these two need as well. #1 is producing as we just need to track the actual work in a fetch and release process. For #2 we use transitional as we want to track all areas of responsibility.
      Based on this we can see that there is no need to see everything that happen in the work we do. We need to see who is doing what and if there are any impediments that could prevent us from completing the need in time. This is why we choose to work with flow charts and not state diagrams.
       
      "Design for collaboration, not control"
       
      If you feel that you must track every single step in the work, then I suggest you take a look at why you need that. Usually it is because you lack trust in your organization due to poor communication or that someone in the chain of management suffer from an unhealthy need for control. Either way you should fix that outside of Jira as we should design for collaboration, not control.
       
      What statuses do we need?
      So now that we know what types of workflows we have to work with and what the need is we need to fulfill, then it's time to break down what statuses we actually need. We start by defining the different areas of responsibility that we need to track in our workflows.
      Development Test Acceptance First we start with adding a waiting status in each so we can fulfill the need of knowing what is ready for us to work on. This will also allow us to get statistics on waiting periods to see where we have resource issues. We name them the same to keep a proper naming convention: "Ready for <area of responsibility>".
      Secondly we add a status for when someone is working on something. Again we can track this for statistics, but most importantly we can quickly see what is being worked on and by whom. We name this the same as well: "In <area of responsibility>.
      We end the basics with setting a Closed status as the last status. This will allow us to set a resolution and indicate that the development work has been completed and is ready to be deployed. I often see people adding things like resolved or done, but in a workflow you should not have partial closure and there is actually no need for it.
      We now have the basics for a fetch and release process and we have fulfilled the first need.
       

       
      In order to fulfill the next need we need to add a few additional statuses, but first we should change the starting status. In Jira we have Open as the first status when a  new issue is created. This is a bad status as it is not clear what Open really mean and I have seen whole organizations failing due to this misunderstanding. So we will rename this status to New if we can do that for the whole organization. If not, then we create a new status and use that as our first status.
      In order to track when something is blocked or waiting for something we add a status called Waiting/On Hold. Even though we can use the flag function to visualize this I have found that a dedicated status usually make this far more visible in the boards.
      We will also add a Reopened status in the event that we need to open a closed status for some reason. This either happen because we close by mistake, but in the event that someone actually revoke a closed issue we want to track that. Adding this is a status allow us to define how we want to handle this situation later.
      Finally we will add a status mostly used for defect management, but it can be used in any development workflow. That status is Rejected. While this can sound like a very harsh status it's purpose is to revert something back to the reporter for clarification rather than using the Close status and then Reopen.
      With just these few statuses we can manage both need to see what is ready for me to work on (ready for <area of responsibility>), who is working on what (In <area of responsibility>)and if there are any issues that need attention (waiting/on hold). We can not take any issue type and look at what area of responsibility is involved in fulfilling that task and then map the statuses we have defined to that.
      All generic workflows will have the same statuses. This makes it very easy to work with boards and no matter what capability you work with you always have only 3 statuses to keep track of: ready for me to work on, I am working on this, ready for someone else.
       
      What about release management?!
      Another common question is how I handle release management since there is no statuses for release. The answer to that is that we do not need that since Jira has that built into the core system in the form or versions. Every development should be closed with at least one version in the Fix Version field to indicate what code package the code is placed in. Every defect should also have an Affect Version that indicate what version of the code the defect was found in.
      By doing this we can map what code is in what package, but Jira should never be master for this information. This information should come from Bitbucket, or similar code versioning tool. This is also the same for deploys, which we do not manage in Jira at all since that is a completely different process. This comes from Bamboo or similar tools.
      The idea of managing deploys as a status in Jira quickly become silly as you would have a separate step that happen long after development, test and acceptance has been completed. This task is unconnected to the areas of responsibility. It is not a producing step, just a transportation step that is done not on story level, but on code package level. Like we established above this is not a part of a workflow since it is an unconnected task. We will however keep track of deployment in Confluence, but we will get to that in later articles.
       
      Let's build the default workflow
      Let us take all the theories above and make it real by designing the workflow in Jira and see if it hold up for real work.

       
      Requirement & business processes happen outside of this workflow. The expectation is that the beginning of the workflow comes in the form of a clarified need as a story. Even in Agile way of working the story is clear enough to be worked on once put into the ”Ready for Development” status.
      Once a story is clear enough to be worked on and we have acceptance from Development and Test, then we move the story to the status "Ready for Development". Producing items are created for development and we start working on the issue  by transition the store to In Development.
      Once done we transition the story to Ready for development to complete the fetch and release process. This is repeated in the test and acceptance steps. In the event that we get a defect, then we create a defect sub-task and block the story from completion. We can use this for all development tasks as they all follow the same path.

      Let's see how we set this up in Jira.
       
      Building workflows in Jira
      In order to build global workflows in Jira you need Admin access to Jira. Go to Jira Settings ->  Issues. Here you will find the two sections we need to configure to build a new workflow and to assign it to a project. Under Workflows you will see the current active and inactive workflows. In the top right corner you will see a button with the text "Add Workflow" Click that and you will get a popup to enter a name for the workflow and a description.

      Once you have added a name and description you will come to the design view. Here you use the "Add Status" to add the statuses we want. We create them with global transitions to make the workflow as open and flexible as possible by checking the box "Allow all statuses to transition to this one".
      I usually have transitions between rejected and new, as well as for Closed to Reopen, just to make it more clear that the rejection is used in a certain part of the workflow. This way you can't go to rejected or reopened from other statuses than the intended ones. In a proper workforce where the users get education on how to use Jira this is not really needed however so you can skip that if you do not feel it is necessary.

       
      Add Workflows to a workflow schema
      Now we can go to workflow schemes where you find all your active and inactive workflow schemes. in the top right corner you have a button with the text "Add workflow scheme". Click that and in the popup you add the name and description of your scheme. You will then be taken to the screen where you add workflows to the scheme and map it to specific issue types.
      Click the add workflow button and select the workflow we created earlier. In the next screen you get to select which issue types you want to map to this workflow. Select the ones you like, which should be all of our development issue types and then click finish. Your scheme is now configured with a workflow that is mapped to the issue types you want. You can edit this scheme at any time should you add workflows and/or issue types.

       
      Add Issue Type Scheme to your project
      Go to your project and then click on project setting in the left menu. It should be at the bottom of the list of areas for your project, but if you can not see it then you may not have admin rights for your project and you need to get some help with this step. If you have access then in the project settings go to Workflows.
      Here you see your current workflow schema and the workflows attached to it. To change click on "Switch Scheme" and select the new scheme that we created above. Click associate and if needed map statuses on the next screen and wait for all statuses to resolve. Once done you have your new workflow scheme mapped and you can start using your new workflow.

       
      We now have workflows setup for our issue types, but we still have a few things to do before they are completely ready to be used. That is to define the screens and custom fields we will use in our setup. That will all be explained in Part 4: Defining Jira Screens & Custom fields that we will look at next.
       

      View full blog article
    • By Jimi Wikman
      In the previous articles we have defined what tool to use for what and what issue types we need. New it's time to define the workflows for those issue types. Before we can do that however we should first define what workflows are and how we should use them in Jira.
      Three types of workflows
      In short we can narrow down workflows to three types: sequential, state machine and rules driven workflows.
      Sequential workflow
      This workflow is usually chart based from one step to the next, always moving forward without ever going back. Each step depends on the completion of the activities on the previous step. You can think of this workflow as a connect the dots system: you have to follow the numbers correctly, one after the other, to complete the big picture.
      State Machine Workflow
      This type of workflow can be considered like puzzle solving, in which you’re constantly putting important pieces in place to complete a project. State machine workflow are frequently used when there are creative elements in the process, or products and services that require extra review or input from clients and management.
      Rules-driven Workflow
      This workflow is executed based on a sequential workflow with rules that dictate the progress of the workflow. This can be compared to following a blueprint to make one complete structure. Rules driven workflows are very useful when working on a variety of projects with clear goals but varying levels of specifications.
      We should also define what a workflow is NOT:
      A workflows is NOT a process - A process is more then just a workflow as it includes data, forms, reports, actors and more. A workflow usually span over multiple processes as we hand over responsibility between different capabilities (requirement, development, test, acceptance).
        A workflow is NOT a list of unconnected tasks - Unconnected tasks are task management and not a workflow.
        A workflow is NOT a checklist - Checklists are binary. It's either done or not done. That is not a workflow.
        A workflow is NOT a state diagram - This is probably the biggest issue I see when people try to design workflows. The idea that you need to track every single state in a workflow comes from a misunderstanding of who we actually build workflows for and what they actually need.  
      "A state machine (panel (a)) performs actions in response to explicit events. In contrast, the flowchart (panel (b)) does not need explicit events but rather transitions from node to node in its graph automatically upon completion of activities." - Wikipedia


       
      Who do we build workflows for?
      In order to understand why state diagrams are not the best choice to design workflows in Jira we should understand who we build workflows for and what purpose they serve.
      The reason we use Jira is because we  want a good way to define and assign work. We also need a way to oversee, or manage, the work. This means that we want a way to track what work we are doing, what the current status is on that work and who is responsible for completing the work at the moment.
      So for developers and testers we want en easy way to see what is ready to be worked on, what is being worked on and and what have we completed. For managers we need the same, but over the whole chain of responsibility. We also want to connect the work to the need so we can follow up when the need is being fulfilled.
      So we have two basic need to fulfill:
      What is ready for me to work on? Are we on track to fulfill the need or do I need to take action? In the previous article we mentioned transitional and producing items when defining what issue types we need. We can match these theories with these two need as well. #1 is producing as we just need to track the actual work in a fetch and release process. For #2 we use transitional as we want to track all areas of responsibility.
      Based on this we can see that there is no need to see everything that happen in the work we do. We need to see who is doing what and if there are any impediments that could prevent us from completing the need in time. This is why we choose to work with flow charts and not state diagrams.
       
      "Design for collaboration, not control"
       
      If you feel that you must track every single step in the work, then I suggest you take a look at why you need that. Usually it is because you lack trust in your organization due to poor communication or that someone in the chain of management suffer from an unhealthy need for control. Either way you should fix that outside of Jira as we should design for collaboration, not control.
       
      What statuses do we need?
      So now that we know what types of workflows we have to work with and what the need is we need to fulfill, then it's time to break down what statuses we actually need. We start by defining the different areas of responsibility that we need to track in our workflows.
      Development Test Acceptance First we start with adding a waiting status in each so we can fulfill the need of knowing what is ready for us to work on. This will also allow us to get statistics on waiting periods to see where we have resource issues. We name them the same to keep a proper naming convention: "Ready for <area of responsibility>".
      Secondly we add a status for when someone is working on something. Again we can track this for statistics, but most importantly we can quickly see what is being worked on and by whom. We name this the same as well: "In <area of responsibility>.
      We end the basics with setting a Closed status as the last status. This will allow us to set a resolution and indicate that the development work has been completed and is ready to be deployed. I often see people adding things like resolved or done, but in a workflow you should not have partial closure and there is actually no need for it.
      We now have the basics for a fetch and release process and we have fulfilled the first need.
       

       
      In order to fulfill the next need we need to add a few additional statuses, but first we should change the starting status. In Jira we have Open as the first status when a  new issue is created. This is a bad status as it is not clear what Open really mean and I have seen whole organizations failing due to this misunderstanding. So we will rename this status to New if we can do that for the whole organization. If not, then we create a new status and use that as our first status.
      In order to track when something is blocked or waiting for something we add a status called Waiting/On Hold. Even though we can use the flag function to visualize this I have found that a dedicated status usually make this far more visible in the boards.
      We will also add a Reopened status in the event that we need to open a closed status for some reason. This either happen because we close by mistake, but in the event that someone actually revoke a closed issue we want to track that. Adding this is a status allow us to define how we want to handle this situation later.
      Finally we will add a status mostly used for defect management, but it can be used in any development workflow. That status is Rejected. While this can sound like a very harsh status it's purpose is to revert something back to the reporter for clarification rather than using the Close status and then Reopen.
      With just these few statuses we can manage both need to see what is ready for me to work on (ready for <area of responsibility>), who is working on what (In <area of responsibility>)and if there are any issues that need attention (waiting/on hold). We can not take any issue type and look at what area of responsibility is involved in fulfilling that task and then map the statuses we have defined to that.
      All generic workflows will have the same statuses. This makes it very easy to work with boards and no matter what capability you work with you always have only 3 statuses to keep track of: ready for me to work on, I am working on this, ready for someone else.
       
      What about release management?!
      Another common question is how I handle release management since there is no statuses for release. The answer to that is that we do not need that since Jira has that built into the core system in the form or versions. Every development should be closed with at least one version in the Fix Version field to indicate what code package the code is placed in. Every defect should also have an Affect Version that indicate what version of the code the defect was found in.
      By doing this we can map what code is in what package, but Jira should never be master for this information. This information should come from Bitbucket, or similar code versioning tool. This is also the same for deploys, which we do not manage in Jira at all since that is a completely different process. This comes from Bamboo or similar tools.
      The idea of managing deploys as a status in Jira quickly become silly as you would have a separate step that happen long after development, test and acceptance has been completed. This task is unconnected to the areas of responsibility. It is not a producing step, just a transportation step that is done not on story level, but on code package level. Like we established above this is not a part of a workflow since it is an unconnected task. We will however keep track of deployment in Confluence, but we will get to that in later articles.
       
      Let's build the default workflow
      Let us take all the theories above and make it real by designing the workflow in Jira and see if it hold up for real work.

       
      Requirement & business processes happen outside of this workflow. The expectation is that the beginning of the workflow comes in the form of a clarified need as a story. Even in Agile way of working the story is clear enough to be worked on once put into the ”Ready for Development” status.
      Once a story is clear enough to be worked on and we have acceptance from Development and Test, then we move the story to the status "Ready for Development". Producing items are created for development and we start working on the issue  by transition the store to In Development.
      Once done we transition the story to Ready for development to complete the fetch and release process. This is repeated in the test and acceptance steps. In the event that we get a defect, then we create a defect sub-task and block the story from completion. We can use this for all development tasks as they all follow the same path.

      Let's see how we set this up in Jira.
       
      Building workflows in Jira
      In order to build global workflows in Jira you need Admin access to Jira. Go to Jira Settings ->  Issues. Here you will find the two sections we need to configure to build a new workflow and to assign it to a project. Under Workflows you will see the current active and inactive workflows. In the top right corner you will see a button with the text "Add Workflow" Click that and you will get a popup to enter a name for the workflow and a description.

      Once you have added a name and description you will come to the design view. Here you use the "Add Status" to add the statuses we want. We create them with global transitions to make the workflow as open and flexible as possible by checking the box "Allow all statuses to transition to this one".
      I usually have transitions between rejected and new, as well as for Closed to Reopen, just to make it more clear that the rejection is used in a certain part of the workflow. This way you can't go to rejected or reopened from other statuses than the intended ones. In a proper workforce where the users get education on how to use Jira this is not really needed however so you can skip that if you do not feel it is necessary.

       
      Add Workflows to a workflow schema
      Now we can go to workflow schemes where you find all your active and inactive workflow schemes. in the top right corner you have a button with the text "Add workflow scheme". Click that and in the popup you add the name and description of your scheme. You will then be taken to the screen where you add workflows to the scheme and map it to specific issue types.
      Click the add workflow button and select the workflow we created earlier. In the next screen you get to select which issue types you want to map to this workflow. Select the ones you like, which should be all of our development issue types and then click finish. Your scheme is now configured with a workflow that is mapped to the issue types you want. You can edit this scheme at any time should you add workflows and/or issue types.

       
      Add Issue Type Scheme to your project
      Go to your project and then click on project setting in the left menu. It should be at the bottom of the list of areas for your project, but if you can not see it then you may not have admin rights for your project and you need to get some help with this step. If you have access then in the project settings go to Workflows.
      Here you see your current workflow schema and the workflows attached to it. To change click on "Switch Scheme" and select the new scheme that we created above. Click associate and if needed map statuses on the next screen and wait for all statuses to resolve. Once done you have your new workflow scheme mapped and you can start using your new workflow.

       
      We now have workflows setup for our issue types, but we still have a few things to do before they are completely ready to be used. That is to define the screens and custom fields we will use in our setup. That will all be explained in Part 4: Defining Jira Screens & Custom fields that we will look at next.
       
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